Author: Main Luxe

My business/studio name is The Carpenter’s Daughter. My style is organic, abstract and fluid – using both learned and instinctual techniques, I create with materials like resin, acrylic paint and pigments along with naturally occurring elements such as minerals, rocks, metals, glass, mica, sand to best express my feelings of connectedness and love to the Earth and ocean.

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By Christina Balsano Wichmann McDonald Farm, Conservation Foundation Headquartershttp://www.theconservationfoundation.org This year, the Conservation Foundation celebrates its 50th anniversary of preserving and restoring open spaces, protecting rivers, and promoting stewardship of the environment in DuPage, Will, Kane, and Kendall counties. The beautiful preserves we enjoy, including Greene Valley Forest Preserve, St. James Farm, and Hidden Lake Forest Preserve are here today thanks to the work of the Conservation Foundation and its early founders and supporters. At present, the Conservation Foundation is executing a multi-year plan that will connect existing open spaces together, extend trail linkages, and preserve remaining natural areas. Since…

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By Ashley South “Lucy Westlake, of Naperville, IL, the youngest American woman ever to summit Mount Everest!” This headline ran for weeks this spring everywhere from the Chicago Tribune to the Wall Street Journal following her May 12th completion of the highest climb on earth. Climbing Mount Everest is the pinnacle athletic feat for any mountain climber, let alone a 17-year-old. So many questions, chief among them: How did she do it? The answer: Amy and Rodney Westlake, Lucy’s parents. We sat down with the family to ask how Lucy became such a driven and accomplished person at such a…

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By Jeanne Schultz Angel of Naper Settlement Somewhat unknown in history, America experienced a “cycling craze” from 1890 to 1900 in which citizens of almost every age, class, gender, and race were wholly invested in the possibilities of bicycles for widespread use. Devotees permeated American culture and helped to improve the infrastructure of our country and change the lifestyle of everyday Americans. A bike shop in Naperville c. 1895 Cyclists represented a new sense of freedom and democracy for everyday citizens with a new, inexpensive form of travel. Bicycles allowed people of modest income the freedom of movement, including women.…

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